MEDICAL CORNER …. Self-breast exam and mammograms …. help save the “tatas”!!


 SBE

WHAT WOMEN NEED TO KNOW

Women’s Health — Breast Self-Exam Tool 

Monthly breast self-exams are an option for all women beginning by age 20. Women who regularly examine their breasts become more aware of how their breasts normally feel. They are more likely to notice changes — including masses or lumps — that could be early signs of cancer. It’s best to check about a week after your period, when breasts are not swollen or tender. If you no longer have a period, examine yourself on the same day every month. If you see or feel a change in your breasts, see your doctor immediately. But remember, most of the time breast changes are not cancer.

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Test 1

Using a mirror, inspect your breasts with your arms at your sides, with your hands on your hips, and with your arms raised while flexing your chest muscles.

Mirror

Test 2

Raise both arms. Look for any changes in contour, swelling, dimpling of skin, or appearance of the nipple. It is normal if your right and left breasts do not match exactly.

RaiseA

Test 3

Using the pads of your fingers, press firmly on your breast, checking the entire breast and armpit area. Move around your breast in a circular, up-and-down, or wedge pattern. Remember to use the same method every month. Check both breasts.

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Test 4

There are three patterns you can use to examine your breast: the circular, the up-and-down, and the wedge patterns. Use the pattern that is easiest for you, and use the same pattern every month.

Pattern

Test 5

Gently squeeze the nipple of each breast and report any discharge to your doctor immediately.

Nip

Test 6

Examine both breasts lying down. To examine the right breast, place a pillow under your right shoulder and place your right hand behind your head. Using the pads of your fingers, press firmly, checking the entire breast and armpit area. Use the same pattern you used while standing. Repeat for your left breast.

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American Cancer Society Guidelines for the Early Detection of Cancer

The American Cancer Society recommends these screening guidelines for most adults.

~~Breast cancer~~

Yearly mammograms are recommended starting at age 40 and continuing for as long as a woman is in good health

Clinical breast exam (CBE) about every 3 years for women in their 20s and 30s and every year for women 40 and over

Women should know how their breasts normally look and feel and report any breast change promptly to their health care provider. Breast self-exam (BSE) is an option for women starting in their 20s.

Some women – because of their family history, a genetic tendency, or certain other factors – should be screened with MRI in addition to mammograms. (The number of women who fall into this category is small: less than 2% of all the women in the US.) Talk with your doctor about your history and whether you should have additional tests at an earlier age.

~~Susan G. Komen for the Cure® recommends~~

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~~Know your risk~~

Talk to your family to learn about your family health history

Talk to your health care provider about your personal risk of breast cancer

~~Get screened~~

Ask your health care provider which screening tests are right for you if you are at higher risk

Have a mammogram every year starting at age 40 if you are at average risk

Have a clinical breast exam at least every 3 years starting at age 20, and every year starting at age 40

Sign up for your screening reminder at komen.org/reminder 

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Know what is normal for you and see your health care provider if you notice any of these breast changes

Lump, hard knot or thickening inside the breast or underarm area

Swelling, warmth, redness or darkening of the breast

Change in the size or shape of the breast

Dimpling or puckering of the skin

Itchy, scaly sore or rash on the nipple

Pulling in of your nipple or other parts of the breast

Nipple discharge that starts suddenly

New pain in one spot that doesn’t go away

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Make healthy lifestyle choices

Maintain a healthy weight

Add exercise into your routine

Limit alcohol intake

Limit menopausal hormone therapy (postmenopausal hormone use)

Breastfeed, if you can

In summary, each one of us is responsible for our own health. This is one of the main duties that we have for ourselves = safeguard our health. A medical provider can’t know something has changed unless you tell her.

So … the ball is in our court.

DON’T FORGET TO CHECK THE “TATAS”!!

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We ALL are ONE!! 

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This entry was posted in Equality by Dr. Rex. Bookmark the permalink.

About Dr. Rex

I'm originally from Puerto Rico. I was born in Santurce and raised in Rio Piedras. Have lived in Florida since 1999. I have a doctorate degree in Medicine; completed in 1976. My Internal Medicine specialty was completed in 1979. Worked for Puerto Rico's health system until 1985. At this time, I'm happily retired after working for the federal government for almost 28yrs. I want to offer any knowledge that I have to anyone "out there" who is interested. My views are liberal in almost every sense. My knowledge is "eclectic" - a bit of everything. Music and reading are my passion. Blogging has also become a very interesting endeavor. Metaphysical topics attract me. I'm interested in news reporting human issues like injustice, discrimination and abuse - the "wrongly" affected. My intention is to bring this knowledge to an understandable level and to help anyone in need. I'm open to questions and will answer them to the best of my ability. Currently working on an enterprise whose main mission will be to bring peoples of all walks of life together. To be one .... since we ALL are ONE!! The future looks bright and promising!!!

2 thoughts on “MEDICAL CORNER …. Self-breast exam and mammograms …. help save the “tatas”!!

  1. Pingback: MEDICAL CORNER …. October is all about pink …. Breast Cancer Awareness Month!! | It Is What It Is

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