Sailor who kissed a nurse in famous WWII photograph dies … aged 86!


~~March 15, 2014~~

The Navy veteran who was famously caught mid-kiss in Times Square after coming home from World War II, 86-year-old Glenn McDuffie, has passed away at the age of 86. McDuffie was only identified as the man in the photo a few years ago when he came forward after several other men claimed to be the sailor.

~~Glenn McDuffie~~

McDuffie said he was in the process of changing trains on August 14, 1945 when he heard that the Japanese had surrendered. Then he ran out into the street and saw the nurse. “She was standing out there in the middle of the street and she turned around and did like that, and I swear I went over there and kissed her,” he once said. He spent the years after the war as a mail carrier and semi-professional baseball player.

Glenn McDuffie, the US Navy veteran who kissed a nurse in an iconic photo taken in New York on V-Day in 1945, has passed away aged 86.

His daughter Glenda McDuffie Bell confirmed that he died of natural causes on Sunday, March 9, 2014, in Dallas, Texas.

Mr McDuffie found fame when he identified himself as the sailor pictured in Alfred Eisenstaedt‘s photo taken on 14 August, 1945, in Time Square, that has become an international symbol for the joy felt  in the US at the end of WWII.

NAvy

His claim was confirmed in 2007 by Lois Gibson, Houston Police Department’s forensic artist, who said after a detailed investigation that Mr. McDuffie’s facial bone structure matched that of the man in the photo.

“He ate it up!” his daughter told NBC News, adding: “He loved the attention.”

Mr. McDuffie, who was a US Navy gunner, said he was changing trains in New York on that summer day, when he learned the war was over and that his brother would be coming home from a Japanese prison camp.

“I was so happy. I ran out in the street,” McDuffie told the Associated Press years later. “And then I saw that nurse,” he said. “She saw me hollering and with a big smile on my face.”

“I just went right to her and kissed her,” he said.

“We never spoke a word,” he said. “Afterward, I just went on the subway across the street and went to Brooklyn.”

Born in 1927 in Kannapolis, North Carolina, Mr. McDuffie played semi-professional baseball after his naval career, and later worked at the Postal Service. He married three times, and settled in Houston Texas, before moving to Dallas in 2009, the New York Daily News reported.

“It certainly got him the recognition that he deserved, and he was able to out to all kinds of events and speak about it and tell how it happened,” his daughter told the US TV network. “When he realized how many people were touched by the photo, it humbled him.”

Despite McDuffie’s claim, the editorial director of Life magazine, which published the photo, said the subjects of the photo will remain a mystery because Mr Eisenstaedt died in 1995 without giving confirmation.

“The recent (claims) are ‘CSI’ types of inquiries. We think that’s great but we just can’t know for sure on our end. We can’t be in a position of anointing one or the other without hard proof,” he said.

~~RELATED~~

http://www.wcvb.com/news/sailor-in-iconic-world-war-ii-kissing-photo-dies/24977462

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-26588030

http://www.thedailybeast.com/cheats/2014/03/15/wwii-kissing-sailor-dies.html

~~RIP: ‘Kissing Sailor’ from Famous World War II Photo Dies~~

~~Published on Mar 14, 2014~~

(KHOU) HOUSTON — The sailor kissing the nurse in the famous end of World War II celebration of V-J day photo taken Aug. 14, 1945 in Times Square has died.
Glenn Edward McDuffie died on Sunday at the age of 86. Lois Gibson, a forensic artist, proved positively McDuffie was the sailor in August 2007 after many men had claimed to be the man in the photo.

McDuffie was born in Kannapolis, N.C. on Aug. 3, 1927. He joined the U.S. Navy at age 15 in 1942 after he found a friend to forge his mother’s signature and amenable notary public. The service for McDuffie will be held at the Dallas/Ft. Worth Veterans Cemetery in Dallas.

We ALL are ONE!! 

Archangel Metatron …..


~~March 15, 2014~~

Archangel Metatron oversees the Merkaba, or Metatron’s Cube.” This magical creation is also called the “chariot of God” and is displayed on the front of the chariot depicted on this card.

Focus on the image of the Merkaba and then call upon Metatron when you have a desire you wish to see come to fruition.

He can help you manifest a successful result in record time!

Full Credit/Source: https://www.facebook.com/radleighvalentine

Metatron or Mattatron (a differentiation of Metatron) is an archangel in Judaism. According to Jewish medieval apocrypha, he is Enoch, ancestor of Noah, transformed into an angel. There are no references to Metatron as an angel in the Jewish Tanakh or Christian scriptures (New and Old Testament); however, Genesis 5:24 is often cited as evidence of Enoch’s bodily ascension into heaven —”And Enoch walked with God: and he was not; for God took him.” Although he is mentioned in a few brief passages in the Talmud, Metatron appears primarily in medieval Jewish mystical texts and other post-scriptural esoteric sources, such as the Books of Enoch: 1 Enoch: Book of Parables, 2 Enoch, and 3 Enoch. In Rabbinic tradition, he is the highest of the angels and serves as the celestial scribe.

Spiritual Angelic Music

We ALL are ONE!! 

To start the day ….


~~March 15, 2014~~

In some Native American cultures, a dreamcatcher (or dream catcherLakota: iháŋbla gmunka, Ojibweasabikeshiinh, the inanimate form of the word for “spider” or Ojibwebawaajige nagwaagan meaning “dream snare”) is a handmade object based on a willow hoop, on which is woven a loose net or web. The dreamcatcher is then decorated with sacred items such as feathers and beads.

DC1

~~Origin~~

Dreamcatchers originated with the Ojibwe people and were later adopted by some neighboring nations through intermarriage and trade. It wasn’t until the Pan-Indian Movement of the 1960s and 1970s, that they were adopted by Native Americans of a number of different nations. Some consider the dreamcatcher a symbol of unity among the various Indian Nations, and a general symbol of identification with Native American or First Nations cultures. 

The Ojibwe people have an ancient legend about the origin of the dreamcatcher. Storytellers speak of the Spider Woman, known as Asibikaashi; she took care of the children and the people on the land. Eventually, the Ojibwe Nation spread to the corners of North America and it became difficult for Asibikaashi to reach all the children. So the mothers and grandmothers would weave magical webs for the children, using willow hoops and sinew, or cordage made from plants. The dreamcatchers would filter out all bad dreams and only allow good thoughts to enter our mind. Once the sun rises, all bad dreams just disappear. American ethnographer Frances Densmore writes in her book Chippewa Customs (1929, republished 1979, pg. 113):

Even infants were provided with protective charms. Examples of these are the “spiderwebs” hung on the hoop of a cradle board. These articles consisted of wooden hoops about 3½ inches in diameter filled with an imitation of a spider’s web made of fine yarn, usually dyed red. In old times this netting was made of nettle fiber. Two spider webs were usually hung on the hoop, and it was said that they “caught any harm that might be in the air as a spider’s web catches and holds whatever comes in contact with it.”

DC2

Traditionally, the Ojibwe construct dreamcatchers by tying sinew strands in a web around a small round or tear-shaped frame of willow (in a way roughly similar to their method for making snowshoe webbing). The resulting “dream-catcher”, hung above the bed, is used as a charm to protect sleeping people, usually children, from nightmares.

The Ojibwe believe that a dreamcatcher changes a person’s dreams. According to Konrad J. Kaweczynski, “Only good dreams would be allowed to filter through… Bad dreams would stay in the net, disappearing with the light of day.” Good dreams would pass through and slide down the feathers to the sleeper.

Another explanation of Lakota origin, “Nightmares pass through the holes and out of the window. The good dreams are trapped in the web, and then slide down the feathers to the sleeping person.

DC6DC5

DC9DC10

DreamButDC8

~~Dreamcatcher Parts~~

When dreamcatchers were originally made, the Ojibwe people used willow hoops and sinew or cordage made from plants. The shape of the dreamcatcher is a circle because it represents how giizis- the sun, moon, month- travel each day across the sky. There is meaning to every part of the dreamcatcher from the hoop to the beads embedded in the webbing.

The strings, or sinews are tied at several points on the circle, with the number of points on the dreamcatcher having different meanings: -13 points- the 13 phases of the moon -8 points-the number of legs on the spider woman of the dreamcatcher legend -7 points- the seven prophecies of the grandfathers -6 points- an eagle or courage -5 points-the star. 

The feathers placed at the bottom of the dreamcatcher also had meaning. It meant breath, or air, it is essential for life. If an owl feather was used, it means wisdom, which was a woman’s feather.

DreamEagleDC7DreamCW

Dream catchers originated in the 1960s and 1970s, and were originally created by the Ojibwa Nation, a tribe of Native Americans. Soon, the dream catcher tradition was adopted by other tribes and stood as a sign of unity. The dream catcher consists of a ring of willow, with a sinew web inside of it, often resembling a spider web. Then, leather or deer sinew strings are hung from the bottom of the ring, and feathers and beads are attached.

The dream catcher is often hung by one’s bedside to help trap or catch bad dreams. Dream catchers can be any size and decorated however one chooses in terms of feather style and color as well as the weave type and number and style of beads attached.

One legend says a grandmother saved a spider and in return he helped her create the dream catcher to catch bad dreams, and let only the good dreams be remembered. This fully illustrates the purpose of the dream catcher; it also symbolizes that a spider’s web is nothing to fear, but instead that the spider is there for protection.

Full Article/Source: http://www.bedroomfurniturespot.com/dreamcatcher-legend

DC11

Legend of dreamcatchers

Uploaded on Aug 11, 2010

This is a short video on three legends (ojibway, wendat and lakota) on Dreamcatchers.

DCCleanse

We ALL are ONE!!

HLN: George Zimmerman, The Next O.J. Simpson


Again??? Go away GZ!!

Dr. Jason Johnson

“If you were wrongly accused of murder and found not guilty, how would you live the rest of your life, particularly if everyone in the world still believed you were the murderer?”
Chuck Klosterman

The majority of Americans who are old enough to remember the O.J. Simpson trial think that he either killed his ex-wife, Nicole, or certainly had something to do with it. When it was all over and Simpson was found not guilty, he had two choices: He could go live life in obscurity with his wealth or continue to try to live the public life of a celebrity he had before. Simpson chose poorly, and that eventually landed him in jail.

Based on his photo-ops and autograph signings at a gun show last weekend in Orlando, Florida, George Zimmerman is making the wrong choice as well, and if he’s not careful, he’ll end up like Simpson.

View original post 654 more words

Boston’s Saint Patricks Day Parade – ‘Boston Beer Company, Sam Adams Cancel Participation in the St. Patrick’s Day Parade’


Way yo go Sam!!!!

The Last Of The Millenniums

sam adams1

sam adams

But NOT for the reason you may be thinking.

It’s actually a great stand on ethics for the brewing company.

20 Gay Veterans wanted to march in the parade and were stopped by parade orgainzers.

‘Statement from the Boston Beer Company’:

“We have been participating in the South Boston St. Patrick’s Day Parade for nearly a decade and have also supported the St. Patrick’s Day breakfast year after year. We’ve done so because of the rich history of the event and to support veterans who have done so much for this country”.

“We were hopeful that both sides of this issue would be able to come to an agreement that would allow everyone, regardless of orientation, to participate in the parade. But given the current status of the negotiations, we realize this may not be possible”.

“We share these sentiments with Mayor Walsh, Congressman Lynch and others and therefore we…

View original post 38 more words