Wesak Full Moon …. May 14, 2014!!


~~May 14, 2014~~

The Wesak Full Moon Meditation is a very Sacred Event for your Soul and subtle bodies. Many may not realize the true importance of this event. It is a priceless opportunity that only comes once a year for your Soul to bathe in Blessings that our human minds have yet to comprehend. 

Once a year, on what is considered to be the most powerful full moon of the year, your Higher Soul gets the chance and privilege to immerse itself in a downpour of Divine Energy to purify your vehicles, chakras and physical body as well as to use that energy to bless Mother Earth. Consequently, as you Bless Mother Earth you are generating tremendous amounts of good karma that can be utilized to bring forth Prosperity, Joy and Happiness in both your Spiritual & Material Life.

Wesak – Buddha’s Birthday

WesakWesak is the first full Moon in Taurus, the time when the veil is thinnest between the higher dimensional planes (6th Dimension Pleiades, 7th Dimension Sirius & 8th Dimension Galactic Core) and the Earthly plane (1st Dimension Crystalline Earth’s Heart).

At the Wesak full moon every year, many people make the trek to the Wesak Valley at the bottom of Mt Kakais in Tibet to celebrate Buddha’s Birthday.

It is at this full moon that Buddha comes closet to Earth as the veil thins, bringing much light, love and healing to humanity.  Heaven and Earth are brought together as one.

I recommend that everyone spends some time alone this full moon, receiving the love of Buddha, and connecting with all humanity in the ONE HEART.

January: The Wolf Moon
In January snow gathers deep in the woods and the howling of wolves can be heard echoing in the cold still air. Some tribes called this moon the Snow Moon, but most often it was used for the next month.

February: The Snow Moon
Snow piles even higher in February, giving this moon its most common name. Among tribes that used this name for the January moon, the February moon was called the Hunger Moon due to the challenging hunting conditions.

March: The Worm Moon
Snow slowly begins to melt, the ground softens, and earthworms show their heads again and their castings or fecal matter can be found. Other signs of spring gave rise to other variations: the cawing of crows (the Crow Moon); the formation of crusts on the snow from repeated thawing and freezing (the Crust Moon); and the time for tapping maple trees (the Sap Moon). Christian settlers also called this the Lenten Moon and considered it the last moon of winter.

April: The Pink Moon
Flowers begin to appear, including the widespread grass pink or wild ground phlox. Other variations indicate more signs of full spring, such as Sprouting Grass Moon, Egg Moon, and Fish Moon (common among coastal tribes).

May: The Flower Moon
Flowers come into full bloom and corn is ready to plant. Also called the Corn Planting Moon and the Milk Moon.

June: The Strawberry Moon
Strawberry-picking season reaches its peak during this time. This is one of the few names that was universal to all Algonquin tribes.



July: The Buck Moon
Buck deer start growing velvety hair-covered antlers in July. Frequent thunderstorms in the New England area also resulted in the name Thunder Moon. Some tribes also used Hay Moon.

August: The Sturgeon Moon
The sturgeon, a large fish common to the Great Lakes and other nearby bodies of water, is most easily caught during this month. The reddish appearance of the moon through the frequent sultry hazes of August also prompted a few tribes to dub it the Red Moon. Other names included the Green Corn Moon and the Grain Moon.

September: The Harvest Moon
Many of the Native American tribes’ staple foods, such as corn, pumpkins, squash, beans, and rice, are ready for gathering at this time. The strong light of the Harvest Moon allowed European farmers to work late into the night to harvest their crops. The Harvest Moon does not always occur in September. Traditionally, the name goes to the full moon closest to the autumn equinox, which falls during October once or twice a decade. Sometimes the September full moon was called the Corn Moon.

October: The Hunter’s Moon
After the fields have been reaped, the leaves begin to fall and the deer are fat and ready for eating. Hunters can ride easily over the fields’ stubble, and the fox and other animals are more easily spotted. Some years the Harvest Moon falls in October instead of September.

November: The Beaver Moon
At this time of year the beavers are busy preparing for winter, and it’s time to set beaver traps and secure a store of warm fur before the swamps freeze over. Some tribes called this the Frosty Moon.

December: The Cold Moon
Winter takes a firm hold and temperatures plummet at this time. Sometimes this moon is also called the Long Night Moon as the winter nights lengthen and the moon spends more time above the horizon opposite a low sun. The full moon name often used by Christian settlers is the “Moon before Yule”.

~~SOURCES~~

http://www.farmersalmanac.com/full-moon-names/

http://www.farmersalmanac.com/full-moon-dates-and-times/

http://www.moonconnection.com/full-moon-names.phtml

http://www.almanac.com/content/full-moon-names

~~Wesak Full Moon~~

~~Published on May 3, 2012~~

For more information, visit http://humanityhealing.net/2012/05/we…

©2012 Humanity Healing. Partial Rights Reserved.

We ALL are ONE!! 

10 thoughts on “Wesak Full Moon …. May 14, 2014!!

      • Same here … chase those clouds away.

        Hang in there a bit .. I’m working on my last post. Maybe you can read it before “closing shop”!!

        Hugs ….

        Like

      • I suspect it is a late night for me, restlessness is settling on my shoulders predictive of a sleepless night. I will wander my house, write in my journal and consider the echos my footsteps make. It is one of those nights.

        Like

      • I hope that it gets better for you!! Sending you light and bright energy to help you!!

        And some homework … hang on. Almost done!! ❤ ….

        Like

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