Full Snow Moon ….. February 2014!


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~~February 14, 2014~~

Valentine’s Day 2014 Full Moon: February’s ‘Snow Moon’ Is Perfect For Lovers

on February 14 2014 8:20 AM 

For couples, romantics and sky-watchers, Valentine’s Day 2014 will be perfect. A full moon will greet lovers and sweethearts on Feb. 14. February’s full moon is also known as the “Snow Moon,” which is quite appropriate in the wake of Winter Storm Pax.

While meteor showers may be a more special, stunning show, the Valentine’s Day full moon will be ideal as it requires no special viewing circumstances. Meteor showers require darkness, and those who cannot escape the bright lights of the city will miss out on a stargazing event. Friday’s full moon will be clearly visible, and all it requires is a brief moment to look up.

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According to the Farmer’s Almanac, February’s full moon is known as the Snow Moon due to traditionally heavy snowfalls that occur in the month of February. That moniker is especially fitting following Winter Storm Pax, which has dumped snow and ice throughout the South and East. As noted by USA Today, for Valentine’s Day, snow is on the ground in 49 out of 50 states, with Florida being the only state with no snow. The snow will continue over the weekend as another snow storm will hit the Northeast and Ohio Valley. The Farmer’s Almanac also notes February’s full moon is also known as the Hunger Moon, due to poor hunting conditions.

The Snow Moon may not share the same recognition as other full moon events, such as the Harvest Moon and the Hunter’s Moon, which occur in September and October, respectively, or a Blue Moon or a Super Moon, but it will make those evening strolls on Valentine’s Day even better.

The Snow Moon will be a normal full moon and will rise at 6:53 p.m. EST, notes EarthSky.

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Source/Full Article: http://www.ibtimes.com/valentines-day-2014-full-moon-februarys-snow-moon-perfect-lovers-1555376

Full Moon Names History

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~~Snow Moon~~

Full Moon names have been used by many cultures to describe the full moon throughout the year. Specifically, Native American tribes used moon phases and cycles to keep track of the seasons by giving a distinctive name to each recurring full moon, including the Snow Moon. The unique full moon names were used to identify the entire month during which each occurred.

Although many Native American tribes gave distinct names to the full moon, the most well known full moon names come from the Algonquin tribes who lived in the area of New England and westward to Lake Superior. The Algonquin tribes had perhaps the greatest effect on the early European settlers in America, and the settlers adopted the Native American habit of naming the full moons.

Source/Article: http://fullmoonphases.com/snow-moon/

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~~Full Moon Names and Meanings~~

Many human cultures have given names to the full moon throughout the year. Different full moon names can be found among the Chinese, Celtic, Old English, and New Guinea cultures, to name a few. In addition, Native American tribes often used moon phases and cycles to keep track of the seasons and gave a unique name to each recurring full moon. The full moon names were used to identify the entire month during which each occurred.

Although many Native American Tribes gave distinct names to the full moon, the most well known names of the full moon come from the Algonquin tribes who lived in the area of New England and westward to Lake Superior. The Algonquin tribes had perhaps the greatest effect on the early European settlers in America, and the settlers adopted the Native American habit of naming the moons. They even invented some of their own names that have been passed down through time.

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The names given below aren’t the only ones that have been used. Every full moon, with one exception, had variations on its name among various Algonquin tribes, not to mention other tribes throughout North America. But the names below are the most common. Some of the variations are also mentioned.

~~January: The Wolf Moon~~
In January snow gathers deep in the woods and the howling of wolves can be heard echoing in the cold still air. Some tribes called this moon the Snow Moon, but most often it was used for the next month.

~~February: The Snow Moon~~
Snow piles even higher in February, giving this moon its most common name. Among tribes that used this name for the January moon, the February moon was called the Hunger Moon due to thechallenging hunting conditions.

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~~March: The Worm Moon~~
Snow slowly begins to melt, the ground softens, and earthworms show their heads again and their castings or fecal matter can be found. Other signs of spring gave rise to other variations: the cawing of crows (the Crow Moon); the formation of crusts on the snow from repeated thawing and freezing (the Crust Moon); and the time for tapping maple trees (the Sap Moon). Christian settlers also called this the Lenten Moon and considered it the last moon of winter.

~~April: The Pink Moon~~
Flowers begin to appear, including the widespread grass pink or wild ground phlox. Other variations indicate more signs of full spring, such as Sprouting Grass Moon, Egg Moon, and Fish Moon (common among coastal tribes).

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~~May: The Flower Moon~~
Flowers come into full bloom and corn is ready to plant. Also called the Corn Planting Moon and the Milk Moon.

~~June: The Strawberry Moon~~
Strawberry-picking season reaches its peak during this time. This is one of the few names that was universal to all Algonquin tribes.

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~~July: The Buck Moon~~
Buck deer start growing velvety hair-covered antlers in July. Frequent thunderstorms in the New England area also resulted in the name Thunder Moon. Some tribes also used Hay Moon.

~~August: The Sturgeon Moon~~
The sturgeon, a large fish common to the Great Lakes and other nearby bodies of water, is most easily caught during this month. The reddish appearance of the moon through the frequent sultry hazes of August also prompted a few tribes to dub it the Red Moon. Other names included the Green Corn Moon and the Grain Moon.

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~~September: The Harvest Moon~~
Many of the Native American tribes’ staple foods, such as corn, pumpkins, squash, beans, and rice, are ready for gathering at this time. The strong light of the Harvest Moon allowed European farmers to work late into the night to harvest their crops. The Harvest Moon does not always occur in September. Traditionally, the name goes to the full moon closest to the autumn equinox, which falls during October once or twice a decade. Sometimes the September full moon was called the Corn Moon.

~~October: The Hunter’s Moon~~
After the fields have been reaped, the leaves begin to fall and the deer are fat and ready for eating. Hunters can ride easily over the fields’ stubble, and the fox and other animals are more easily spotted. Some years the Harvest Moon falls in October instead of September.

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~~November: The Beaver Moon~~
At this time of year the beavers are busy preparing for winter, and it’s time to set beaver traps and secure a store of warm fur before the swamps freeze over. Some tribes called this the Frosty Moon.

~~December: The Cold Moon~~
Winter takes a firm hold and temperatures plummet at this time. Sometimes this moon is also called the Long Night Moon as the winter nights lengthen and the moon spends more time above the horizon opposite a low sun. The full moon name often used by Christian settlers is the “Moon before Yule”.

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~~Blue Moon~~
Note that due to the 29-day lunar cycle the exact dates of the full moon move every year. Most seasons have three full moons, but because of the variation some seasons have four full moons. The term “blue moon” was used to identify one of these extra full moons. A mistaken definition in the March 1946 edition of Sky and Telescope magazine claimed the blue moon fell on the second full moon of the calendar month. This mistake caused widespread misunderstanding until it was finally corrected in 1999.

Source/Full Article: http://www.moonconnection.com/full-moon-names.phtml

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FULL MOON FEBRUARY 14, 2014

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Published on Jan 19, 2014

Breaking News: February 14,2014 will be the Full Snow Moon lets all enjoy this video you could see a very strange window effect really cool . Music & Video by Didier Manchione all rights reserved Moonfull publishing Socan Canada 2014 MUSICNEWS NETWORK.

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We ALL are connected to the MOON!!

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We ALL are ONE!! 

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