Stories of Normandy …. Sgt. Jim “Pee Wee” Martin!!


~~June 6, 2014~~ 

Seventy years ago, Jim “Pee Wee” Martin parachuted into France, behind German enemy lines, in the dark of night ahead of the D-Day invasion.

Today at the age of 93, the World War ll veteran jumped into Normandy again, in a full military kit, to mark the anniversary of the June 6th landings by Allied troops.

Before jumping he said, “They are worried about me getting hurt. I said, ‘Don’t worry about it. If I get hurt or I get killed, what is the difference? I’ve lived 93 years. I’ve had a good life.'”

The Normandy landings, codenamed Operation Neptune, were the landing operations on 6 June 1944 (termed D-Day) of the Allied invasion of Normandy in Operation Overlord during World War II. The largest seaborne invasion in history, the operation began the invasion of German-occupied western Europe, led to the restoration of the French Republic, and contributed to an Allied victory in the war.

Planning for the operation began in 1943. In the months leading up to the invasion, the Allies conducted a substantial military deception, codenamed Operation Bodyguard, to mislead the Germans as to the date and location of the main Allied landings.

The weather on D-Day was far from ideal, but postponing would have meant a delay of at least two weeks, as the invasion planners had requirements for the phase of the moon, the tides, and the time of day that meant only a few days in each month were deemed suitable. Hitler placed German Field Marshal Erwin Rommel in command of German forces and of developing fortifications along the Atlantic Wall in anticipation of an Allied invasion.

The amphibious landings were preceded by extensive aerial and naval bombardment and an airborne assault — the landing of 24,000 British, US, and Canadian airborne troops shortly after midnight. Allied infantry and armoured divisions began landing on the coast of France starting at 06:30. The target 50-mile (80 km) stretch of the Normandy coast was divided into five sectors: UtahOmahaGoldJuno and Sword Beach. Strong winds blew the landing craft east of their intended positions, particularly at Utah and Omaha.

The men landed under heavy fire from gun emplacements overlooking the beaches, and the shore was mined and covered with obstacles such as wooden stakes, metal tripods, and barbed wire, making the work of the beach clearing teams difficult and dangerous. Casualties were heaviest at Omaha, with its high cliffs. At Gold, Juno, and Sword, several fortified towns were cleared in house-to-house fighting, and two major gun emplacements at Gold were disabled using specialised tanks.

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The Allies failed to achieve all of their goals on the first day. CarentanSt. Lô, and Bayeux remained in German hands, and Caen, a major objective, was not captured until 21 July. Only two of the beaches (Juno and Gold) were linked on the first day, and all five bridgeheads were not connected until 12 June.

However, the operation gained a foothold that the Allies gradually expanded over the coming months. German casualties on D-Day were around 1,000 men. Allied casualties were at least 12,000, with 4,414 confirmed dead. Museums, memorials, and war cemeteries in the area host many visitors each year.

~~SOURCE~~

https://www.facebook.com/GrowingBolder?fref=photo

http://www.army.mil/d-day/

https://www.facebook.com/GrowingBolder

http://www.french-news-online.com/wordpress/?p=35580#axzz33uWa6FZl

~~Veterans Of D-Day Landings Make Pilgrimage To Normandy~~

~~Published on Jun 5, 2014~~

Veterans of the D-Day landings have made a pilgrimage back to the beaches of Normandy in France, to pay tribute to comrades killed on that fateful ‘Longest Day’ in 1944.

We ALL are ONE!!

Invasion of Normandy …. 70 years ago today!!


~~June 6, 2014~~ 

The Invasion of Normandy was the invasion and establishment of Western Allied forces in Normandy, during Operation Overlord in 1944 during World War II, the largest amphibious invasion to ever take place.

D-Day, the date of the initial assaults, was Tuesday 6 June 1944 and Allied land forces that saw combat in Normandy on that day came from Canada, the Free French Forces, the United Kingdom, and the United States. In the weeks following the invasion, Polish forces also participated, as well as contingents from Belgium, Czechoslovakia, Greece, and the Netherlands. Most of the above countries also provided air and naval support, as did the Royal Australian Air Force, the Royal New Zealand Air Force and the Royal Norwegian Navy.

The Normandy invasion began with overnight parachute and glider landings, massive air attacks and naval bombardments. In the early morning, amphibious landings on five beaches codenamed JunoGold,OmahaUtah, and Sword began and during the evening the remaining elements of the parachute divisions landed. Land forces used on D-Day deployed from bases along the south coast of England, the most important of these being Portsmouth.

Invasion of Normandy
Part of Operation Overlord (World War II)
Into the Jaws of Death 23-0455M edit.jpg
Into the Jaws of Death by Robert F. Sargent. Assault craft land one of the first waves at Omaha Beach. The U.S. Coast Guardcaption identifies the unit as Company E, 16th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division.
Date 6 June 1944 – mid-July 1944
Location Normandy, France
Coordinates49°20′N 0°34′W
Result Allied victory
Belligerents
Allies United Kingdom
 United States
 Canada
 Free French Forces
Poland Poland
 Australia[nb 1]
Belgium Free Belgian Forces
 New Zealand
 Netherlands
 Norway[1]
Czechoslovakia Free Czechoslovak Forces
 Greece
Axis Germany
Commanders and leaders
United States Dwight D. Eisenhower
(Supreme Allied Commander)
United Kingdom Arthur Tedder(Deputy Supreme Allied Commander)
United Kingdom Bernard Montgomery (21st Army Group, Ground Forces Commander in Chief)
United Kingdom Trafford Leigh-Mallory (Air Commander in Chief)
United Kingdom Bertram Ramsay(Naval Commander in Chief)
United States Omar Bradley (U.S. 1st Army)
United Kingdom Miles Dempsey(British 2nd Army)
 Canada Major-General R.F.L Keller.(Commander, 3rd Canadian Division (Juno Beach), Canadian Army)
 Canada Lt. General H.D.G. Crerar(Commander, First Canadian Army)
Nazi Germany Gerd von Rundstedt(Oberbefehlshaber West)
Nazi Germany Erwin Rommel(Heeresgruppe B)
Nazi Germany Friedrich Dollmann(7 Armeeoberkommando)
Nazi Germany Leo Geyr von Schweppenburg (Panzer Group West)
Strength
1,332,000 (by 24 July) 380,000 (by 23 July)
Casualties and losses
24 July:
~120,000 casualties
24 July:
113,059 casualties

~~Planning of the invasion~~

U.S. soldiers march through Weymouth, Dorset en route to board landing ships for the invasion of France.

Allied forces rehearsed their roles for D-Day months before the invasion. On 28 April 1944, in south Devon on the English coast, 638 U.S. soldiers and sailors were killed when German torpedo boats surprised one of these landing exercises, Exercise Tiger.

In the months leading up to the invasion, the Allied forces conducted a deception operation, Operation Fortitude, aimed at misleading the Germans with respect to the date and place of the invasion.

There were several leaks prior to or on D-Day. Through the Cicero affair, the Germans obtained documents containing references to Overlord, but these documents lacked all detail. Double Cross agents, such as the Spaniard Joan Pujol (code named Garbo), played an important role in convincing the German High Command that Normandy was at best a diversionary attack. U.S. Major General Henry Miller, chief supply officer of the US 9th Air Force, during a party at Claridge’s Hotel in London complained to guests of the supply problems he was having but that after the invasion, which he told them would be before 15 June, supply would be easier. After being told, Eisenhower reduced Miller to lieutenant colonel [Associated Press, June 10, 1944] and sent him back to the U.S. where he retired. Another such leak was General Charles de Gaulle‘s radio message after D-Day. He, unlike all the other leaders, stated that this invasion was the real invasion. This had the potential to ruin the Allied deceptions Fortitude North and Fortitude South. For example, Gen. Eisenhower referred to the landings as the initial invasion.

~~FULL READ/SOURCE~~

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Invasion_of_Normandy

http://www.nysm.nysed.gov/citizensoldier/conflicts/WWIIeto/normandy.cfm

http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USA/USA-C-Normandy/

~~THANK YOU TO A MONTPELIER VIEW BLOG~~

Post: http://mrmadison.net/2014/06/06/70-years-ago-it-was-d-day/

~~Celebrating Service: 70th Anniversary of Normandy~~

~~Published on May 23, 2014~~

USAA is proud to recognize the 70th Anniversary of Normandy and salute all of the brave men and women who so gallantly served our country.

We ALL are connected through HUMANITY!! 

We ALL are ONE!!