At the end of the day .… “Labor Day Weekend …. Labor Movement”!!


LabDay

~~September 4, 2015~~ 

LABOR DAY WEEKEND …. LABOR MOVEMENT

I’ll be taking a few days off for this long weekend.

I didn’t want to “leave” without honoring the labor movement of old times.

They were the ones who laid the foundation to the prosperity which was once part of this country.

Unions were very important in setting the groundwork.

The pride, the strength and the stamina of this country was set there.

It’s about time to fight to get it back again.

I will be back soon.

Enjoy and be safe.

HortyRex©

BLine

Labor Day in the United States is a public holiday celebrated on the first Monday in September.

It honors the American labor movement and the contributions that workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of their country.

Labor Day was promoted by the Central Labor Union and the Knights of Labor, who organized the first parade in New York City. After the Haymarket Massacre in Chicago on May 4, 1886, U.S. President Grover Clevelandfeared that commemorating Labor Day on May 1 could become an opportunity to commemorate the affair. Therefore, in 1887, the United States holiday was established in September to support the Labor Day that the Knights favored.

BLine

~~GRAPHIC SOURCE~~ 

https://www.facebook.com/wisaflcio?fref=photo

BLine

History

In 1882, Matthew Maguire, a machinist, first proposed the holiday while serving as secretary of the CLU (Central Labor Union) of New York. Others argue that it was first proposed by Peter J. McGuire of the American Federation of Labor in May 1882,[3] after witnessing the annual labor festival held in Toronto, Canada. Oregon was the first state to make it a holiday on February 21, 1887. By the time it became a federal holiday in 1894, thirty states officially celebrated Labor Day.

Following the deaths of a number of workers at the hands of the U.S. military and U.S. Marshals during the Pullman Strike, the United States Congress unanimously voted to approve rush legislation that made Labor Day a national holiday; President Grover Cleveland signed it into law a mere six days after the end of the strike.

The September date originally chosen by the CLU of New York and observed by many of the nation’s trade unions for the previous several years was selected rather than the more widespread International Workers’ Day because Cleveland was concerned that observance of the latter would be associated with the nascent socialist and anarchist movements that, though distinct from one another, had rallied to commemorate the Haymarket Affair in International Workers’ Day. All U.S. states, the District of Columbia, and the territories have made it a statutory holiday.

“As it appears in … full read/full credit”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Labor_Day

BLine

~~GALLERY~~

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

BLine

#AtTheEndOfTheDay #LaborDay #HonoringWorkers #LaborDayWeekend #LaborMovement #MatthewMaguire #Machinist #CLU #CentralLaborUnion #HonorsAmericanLaborMovement #Strength #Prosperity #WellBeing #Country #HonorLabor #SacrificesOfThePast

#WeAlllAreOne #ItIsWhatItIs #DrRex #HortyRex #hrexachwordpress

BLine

~~Labor Day~~

Remembering how it was

~~Published on Sep 2, 2012~~

Labor Day Remembrance: Honoring the Sacrifices of the Past.

This is based on research for “Blood on the Constitution.”

BLine

We ALL are ONE!! 

RexYinYang1

To start the day …. it’s not just a day off!!


Lab2

~~September 1, 2014~~ 

Did you know that this Labor Day is the 120th anniversary of the national celebration? Former President Grover Cleveland signed legislation in 1894 making Labor Day a national holiday.

Border1

I wasn’t going to write any post about Labor Day today. There are plenty out there. However, I ran into the information above ….. 120th anniversary of such an important day!

As with many holidays, the main thing is getting the day off, celebrating the beginning or ending of summer, going to the beach, the ever present BBQ. 

Usually there is so much more than that and how easy we forget!

L20

“At is appears in …. ” 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Labor_Day

http://time.com/3222093/labor-day-school-white-history-monday-september/

L13

Labor Day in the United States is a holiday celebrated on the first Monday in September. It is a celebration of the American labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of their country.

Labor Day was promoted by the Central Labor Union and the Knights of Labor, who organized the first parade in New York City. After the Haymarket Massacre, which occurred in Chicago on May 4, 1886, U.S. President Grover Cleveland feared that commemorating Labor Day on May 1 could become an opportunity to commemorate the affair. Thus, in 1887, it was established as an official holiday in September to support the Labor Day that the Knights favored.

The equivalent holiday in Canada, Labour Day, is also celebrated on the first Monday of September. In many other countries (more than 80 worldwide), “Labour Day” is synonymous with, or linked with, International Workers’ Day, which occurs on May 1.

LD

But the Labor Day holiday has a storied past, one of violence and celebration, that’s embedded deep in the history of the American labor movement. And while it has spread around the world in different forms, Labor Day has distinctly American roots.

When did Labor Day begin?

The modern holiday is widely traced back to an organized parade in New York City in 1882. Union leaders had called for what they had labelled a “monster labor festival” on Tuesday, Sept. 5, according to Linda Stinson, a former historian for the Department of Labor (the idea for a general labor festival may have originated in Canada, which today also celebrates “Labour Day” on the first Monday in September). Initially that morning, few people showed up, and organizers worried that workers had been reluctant to surrender a day’s pay to join the rally. But soon the crowds began flowing in from across the city, and by the end of the day some 10,000 people had marched in the parade and joined festivities afterward in what the press dubbed “a day of the people.”

When did it become an official holiday?

The practice of holding annual festivities to celebrate workers spread across the country, but Labor Day didn’t become a national holiday for more than a decade. Oregon became the first state to declare it a holiday in 1887, and states like New York, Massachusetts and Colorado soon followed suit. Under President Grover Cleveland, and amid growing awareness of the labor movement, the first Monday in September became a national holiday in 1896.

L22

Why is it on the first Monday in September anyway?

Labor union leaders had pushed for a September date for the New York demonstration, which coincided with a conference in the city of the Knights of Labor, one of the largest and most influential of the unions. The first two New York City Labor Days took place on the 5th of September, but in 1884, the third annual New York City Labor Day holiday was scheduled for the first Monday in September, and that date stuck.

Lab1

~~A GALLERY … THROUGH TIME~~

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

L12

~~The History behind Labor Day~~

~Published on Sept 3, 2012~

Labor Day is an American federal holiday observed on the first Monday in September (September 3 in 2012) that celebrates the economic and social contributions of workers. In 1882, Matthew Maguire, a machinist, first proposed the holiday while serving as secretary of the CLU (Central Labor Union) of New York. Others argue that it was first proposed by Peter J. McGuire of the American Federation of Labor in May 1882, after witnessing the annual labor festival held in Toronto, Canada.

Oregon was the first state to make it a holiday in 1887. By the time it became a federal holiday in 1894, thirty states officially celebrated Labor Day. Following the deaths of a number of workers at the hands of the U.S. military and U.S. Marshals during the Pullman Strike, the United States Congress unanimously voted to approve rush legislation that made Labor Day a national holiday; President Grover Cleveland signed it into law a mere six days after the end of the strike.

The September date originally chosen by the CLU of New York and observed by many of the nation’s trade unions for the past several years was selected rather than the more widespread International Workers’ Day because Cleveland was concerned that observance of the latter would be associated with the nascent Communist, Syndicalist and Anarchist movements that, though distinct from one another, had rallied to commemorate the Haymarket Affair in International Workers’ Day. All U.S. states, the District of Columbia, and the territories have made it a statutory holiday.

L15

We ALL are ONE!! 

Border1